Stop Loss Positioning Guide
#57
I still don't know where the 3.72 and 4.96 figures came from.

(02-04-2019, 07:51 PM) Wrote:
(02-04-2019, 02:53 AM)Red Barron Wrote: How was 3.72%-4.96% calculated from 0.809 ATR ? 3.72-4.96% of what? And with that 3.72-4.96%, how do you then calculate the price of the stop? #confused

Sorry, my bad. The % sign should be an x (i.e. multiplied by) really. It was just how I was referencing them at the time when I wrote this. So the range would have been be 3.72x to 4.96x the 200 day ATR.
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#58
(02-06-2019, 02:14 AM)Red Barron Wrote: I still don't know where the 3.72 and 4.96 figures came from.

Stan recommended additional buying on a pullback to the 56 to 57 zone. So as the 200 day ATR was 0.809 at the time, and the investor stop position was at 52.99. That meant that 56 - 52.99 = 3.01. So therefore 3.01 divided by 0.809 = 3.72 times the 200 day ATR. Whereas if you bought at 57, then with the stop loss position at 52.99, that's 57 - 52.99 = 4.01. So therefore 4.01 divided by 0.809 = 4.96 times the 200 day ATR.

   
isatrader

Fate does not always let you fix the tuition fee. She delivers the educational wallop and presents her own bill – Reminiscences of a Stock Operator.
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#59
This chart says to "buy a close" above breakout resistance. Note, the quote says just to buy "a close" above resistance, not necessarily the 1st close after breakout. Curious and vague. I don\'t remember reading in the book to buy a close. Often, a stock will jump up and close at a high price only to tank the next morning or in after hours trading. So, I'm a little hesistant to buy at the close. I thought the book implied to just buy 1/8 of dollar above resistance. Sam's book badly needs a new edition written by him, or someone else w/expertise. The market and trading has changed so much since back then.

(03-20-2013, 08:27 PM) Wrote: Trailing Stop Loss Guide for Traders (Average 2 to 4 months)

[Image: attachment.php?aid=521]
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#60
(02-06-2019, 09:20 PM)Red Barron Wrote: This chart says to "buy a close" above breakout resistance. Note, the quote says just to buy "a close" above resistance, not necessarily the 1st close after breakout. Curious and vague. I don\'t remember reading in the book to buy a close. Often, a stock will jump up and close at a high price only to tank the next morning or in after hours trading. So, I'm a little hesistant to buy at the close. I thought the book implied to just buy 1/8 of dollar above resistance. Sam's book badly needs a new edition written by him, or someone else w/expertise. The market and trading has changed so much since back then.

That's because of newer information than the book as Stan has run a service since the 1990s called the Global Trend Alert for institutional investors, so the method has evolved over the years. Which was part of the reason for me starting this site as it helped me to gather more information on the method and talk with other people trading with it.

But to the specific point you mentioned. Read the Q&A that I did with Stan Weinstein in 2013 here: https://stageanalysis.net/forum/showthre...623#pid623 The second question on false breakouts highlights the reason for buying a close instead of using buy stops nowadays.

The method took me many years to get a handle of properly, so read as much as you can, and practice every day, as there's no short cuts I'm afraid. Althought there's a wealth of information on the forum from all the years of discussions. So that should help give you a leg up if you take the time to read through.
isatrader

Fate does not always let you fix the tuition fee. She delivers the educational wallop and presents her own bill – Reminiscences of a Stock Operator.
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