Beginners Questions
#9
(04-10-2013, 11:07 AM)isatrader Wrote:
(04-10-2013, 03:18 AM)Sapphire Wrote: Is it me, or is dojispace super slow?

It wasn't a scanner that I'd seen before. But yes it seems slow and doesn't offer much for Weinstein's method other than MA crossovers which can be done and more in most of the other scanners that were on the list that goodtyneguy posted here: http://stageanalysis.net/forum/showthrea...421#pid421 from the old trade2win thread.

As I said before, I wouldn't worry too much about scanners at the moment. The most important thing to do is to learn to identify the four major stages at a glance imo, so that you can easily pick out the stocks with the most potential when manually looking through your charts.

yeah your right. I'm dumping the scanners and going back to the basics in this book. I see it takes discipline (speaking for me) and removing my preconceived notions of how to pick stocks. The junk I learned as a broker. LOL. Thanks isatrader!
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#10
(04-12-2013, 07:43 PM)Sapphire Wrote: yeah your right. I'm dumping the scanners and going back to the basics in this book. I see it takes discipline (speaking for me) and removing my preconceived notions of how to pick stocks. The junk I learned as a broker. LOL. Thanks isatrader!

Big Grin that made me laugh, thanks for your candor.
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#11
My question isn't about technical analysis or how to do something. It is more of a touchy feely question. I am having trouble setting aside the daily time to put into working this system with all you dedicated folks. Presently, I am willing to commit to 2 hours a day/365 days a year on this endeavor. Some days even more if time permits. It just doesn't seem to happen. What works for you investors that are doing this daily? Do you work the same time everyday like a job? Do you split it up and do some in morning and some at night? What type of schedule do you investing junkies find works best? I have the time, interest, and a wonderful opportunity to interact here with like minded folks. I just cant seem to get on a schedule that works. Hope this doesn't sound like a whiny question. Looking forward to see what works for others.

Beaches
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#12
(04-22-2013, 01:24 PM)Beaches Wrote: My question isn't about technical analysis or how to do something. It is more of a touchy feely question. I am having trouble setting aside the daily time to put into working this system with all you dedicated folks. Presently, I am willing to commit to 2 hours a day/365 days a year on this endeavor. Some days even more if time permits. It just doesn't seem to happen. What works for you investors that are doing this daily? Do you work the same time everyday like a job? Do you split it up and do some in morning and some at night? What type of schedule do you investing junkies find works best? I have the time, interest, and a wonderful opportunity to interact here with like minded folks. I just cant seem to get on a schedule that works. Hope this doesn't sound like a whiny question. Looking forward to see what works for others.

Beaches

I think it's a good question to ask and would be interesting to know how other people fit it into their days. For me personally, I decided a few years back after reading the book a few times that I wanted to dedicate a fair bit of time to study the method in more detail as my working theory was that a method that has worked for over 25 years and is still used today by institutional investors that pay around $60k a year for Weinsteins services must have something to it. So I've approached it like studying for a part time degree and have worked it around my normal work day. Working from home helps me immensely, as I break my day up between my normal design work and studying the method. But obviously someone else could learn it more gradually a few evenings a week or by dedicating some time each week at the weekend. Especially with the additional info that we've come across through the various threads over these last few years.

I also think it very much depends on your investing timescale. i.e. I think for someone such as yourself that wants to learn the method, but can't find the time, would do much better to ignore the trader method and only pursue learning the investor method. As that way you can gradually create a long term portfolio which you can monitor around once a week and can ignore all the daily gyrations in the stock market. Weinsteins approach is most suited to the investor method anyway, as he's regularly said that the long term is a 10 on the Richter scale and the short term is only a 2 on the Richter scale. But he does both for his clients as they demand the short term picks.

So everyone will learn at a different pace, but my hope is that if we can create a focused community on here then we can all help each other to be better - a kind of crowdsourcing if you like.
isatrader

Fate does not always let you fix the tuition fee. She delivers the educational wallop and presents her own bill – Reminiscences of a Stock Operator.
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#13
Hey Beaches- That is an interesting question indeed and I completely understand not being able to stick to a schedule. I have been battling the same problem since I began..I have been blessed by having certain jobs that let me get on every other hour or so but it was only for 30 minutes here and an hour there which has made it difficult to follow on train of thought. (I often find myself researching a subject only to pick something else up a couple hours later and finally forgetting about my first endeavor until weeks later...) I can only offer you a tiny bit of advice which has seemed to help me. I have made a habit of checking almost every tape of the stocks in the S&P 400 midcaps on a weekly basis which has helped a bit. I do so on the weekends to see the weekly close and just look for the best charts regardless of the sector. I make notes of which stocks look like good buys (up or down) and I average out the results when I am finished. If I see patterns such as one sector standing out more, I then try to isolate that sector and check out all of those stocks.

As for all of the other things that go for the method, I am learning slowly but surely and reading isa's market breadth thread really does wonders.

Good luck buddy-
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#14
(04-22-2013, 01:24 PM)Beaches Wrote: . . . I am willing to commit to 2 hours a day/365 days a year on this endeavor. . . .
You need to give a money value to your time, and that adds up to a heck of a lot of money, so, purely on cost-benefit terms, you could try the sharehunter.net subscription and see if you are more at ease rather than trying to start from scratch.
Second, just study a shortlist, and isatrader's breakout/breakdown list is the obvious example, and isatrader has mentioned other methods to compile a shortlist.
Third, find some software which offers a quick visual view rather than having to type stock symbols. These can be "next" arrow methods, or, as with chartmill, a "hover" method. Even if the chart offered is not an ideal chart, e.g. it could be daily and it could be for only 6 months or offering 50 MA, not 30MA, by comparing it to a Weinstein chart design, then you will get the hang of which shapes suggest studying the stock further.
Fourth, you could avoid choppy sideways periods in the stockmarket to take time off from new positions, to conserve your enthusiasm for more promising periods.
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#15
Eeek...2 hours a day is pretty dedicated. I do my investing on the weekends, as I think that is what the book recommends to do. I also like Isatrader's watchlist.
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#16
Do you recommend any website or software where i can pull up a bunch of charts from a specific sector, so I can glance at them all at once?
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